Sports Journalism: Ethical Minefield or Vacuum?

The British media are no strangers to ethical controversies. Phone-hacking scandals, the Fake Sheikh, and treatment of Christopher Jefferies have all tarnished the reputation of the press in this country in recent years. Sports Journalism, however, seems to have escaped these preconceptions. Perhaps because of the nature of the subject

A Day at the Arsenal Museum

Despite a tricky couple of years on the pitch, Arsenal fans stand by their history. They became the first London club to win England’s top flight in 1931 and remain the capital’s most decorated side domestically, with 13 league titles and the same number of FA Cups.  This history is well

“I so believed that we were actually going to get to the top six”: Dean Smith reflects on a frustrating season for Brentford

TS Eliot famously wrote - in his modernist epic The Waste Land - that ‘April is the cruellest month.’ Whilst the poet is here referencing the degradation of humanity, the line in fact seems cannily relevant to domestic football: April signals what many deem ‘the business end’ of the season.  For

One step too far: a requiem for the Panini football sticker

Got, got need: Panini stickers are back! Cue the inevitable blitz of your local newsagent, the frustration as you tear open a pack only to be met with your 16th adhesive likeness of Graeme Le Saux, and the impromptu swap markets that will spring up in every park, office and school

Wilt Chamberlain and the Unbreakable Scoring Record

The debate surrounding sport’s unbreakable records always provides a fascinating microcosmic insight into the nature of competition at the highest level. Today marks the anniversary of perhaps one of the most enduring statistics in the world of professional sport: Wilt Chamberlain’s 100-point game.  To speculate on the nature of sporting records,