“I used to think it was a bit of a cop-out sport”: Gemma Bridge on her rapid race walking rise and balancing Commonwealth ambitions with a doctorate

Race walking is an interesting sport. Much-maligned and often cast aside as a pariah in amongst the hulking razzmatazz of track and field sport, the discipline was culled from the schedule altogether at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. An official reason for race walking’s absence from the Glaswegian streets was

“It just makes life so much easier”: Chris Adcock on playing doubles as husband and wife, funding cuts, a love of dogs and going for Commonwealth gold

Michael Jordan knew a fair bit about winning. And it was the great Chicago Bulls shooting guard who declared: “Talent wins games, but teamwork and intelligence win championships.” For Chris Adcock, these words could scarcely be more pertinent. Ranked seventh in world badminton, the 28-year-old heads to April’s Commonwealth Games as

“Because I loved boxing, people assumed that I wanted to be a boy”: Stacey Copeland on women’s boxing, perceptions of femininity and deciding against a nickname

Until 1997, women could not legally box in Great Britain. It would be another fifteen years before Nicola Adams and Katie Taylor would announce themselves to the world in London, as women’s boxing made its debut at the 2012 Olympics. Six years on, there are just three weight categories for women

“Success breeds popularity – people want a piece of it”: why women’s cricket continues its rapid rise

It was mid-afternoon on a muggy July Sunday when Anya Shrubsole put the finishing touches to the gold standard of World Cups. For one day shy of a month, English cricket put on a show like no other. It would be a spectacle with a fitting conclusion, with Shrubsole’s yorker

“I felt lost – I’d had this one goal to win the Olympics”: Adrian Moorhouse on swimming as escapism, Olympic gold and the mental strain on today’s athletes

“Yes, I won the Olympics but at some point, I couldn’t swim; like any other kid, I had to learn how,” Adrian Moorhouse reflects with a considered poignancy as we discuss the development of a champion athlete. It is a world that Moorhouse, a gold medallist in the 100m breaststroke at

The Simply Red guitarist who became Liverpool’s masseur: Sylvan Richardson on working in football, Sir Chris Hoy and one of Britain’s greatest groups

Sylvan Richardson chuckles as he recounts an anecdote from his time as Liverpool’s masseur, working under his old boss, Brendan Rodgers. “I’d be going about my business and Brendan would be with one of his manager friends and he’d be like: ‘Oh, come and meet Sylvan. He was in Simply Red!’.”

“I don’t feel blind when I’m on the mat”: the remarkable story of Rob Long – the Afghanistan veteran with an incredible jiu-jitsu dream

In a month’s time, Rob Long will head to Aldershot, where he will be looking to retain the Brazilian jiu-jitsu title he won back in 2017. However, this is no ordinary jiu-jitsu tournament, and Rob Long is no ordinary man. On 8th July 2010, Long was injured in Afghanistan while serving

Looking past the Eagle: 10 Winter Olympians whose remarkable stories you would never believe

30 years ago, the Jamaican bobsleigh team competed at the Calgary Olympics. Their story inspired the cult film, Cool Runnings. They were joined by Eddie the Eagle who still holds the British ski-jumping record. Before Calgary, just five tropical nations had sent teams to the Winer Games. Since then, 33 unlikely

“Fast bowling is something that is born within someone”: Steven Finn on the Ashes, dealing with disappointment and bowling quick

Since Steven Finn made his Test match bow against Bangladesh in 2010, 36 Englishmen have been handed their debuts in cricket’s toughest format. A debutant just seven months after Jonathan Trott made his international entrance and more than two years before Joe Root arrived on the scene, it is easy

“We had never even raced a four-man bobsled before the Olympics”: Devon Harris on Cool Runnings and the incredible story of the Jamaican bobsleigh team

“I think people still recall our story because people can see themselves in us,” Devon Harris says pensively, smiling as he recalls his role in one of sport’s most extraordinary feats. Harris worked as an officer in the Jamaica Defence Force until he thrust himself into a life-changing gamble in late