“I was not put on this earth to play cricket”: Lewis Hatchett on missing half a rib cage, the stigma of body image and an extraordinary drive to defeat adversity

Sat opposite Lewis Hatchett in a coastal tearoom bustling with activity on a rare sun-drenched afternoon, it is difficult to fathom that the former Sussex seamer is anything but the archetypal fast bowler. Tall, broad shouldered with a confident stride, his retirement two summers ago at the age of just

“I didn’t really know what the heptathlon was”: Niamh Emerson on being hailed a rising star, British heptathlon success and a better junior record than Jess Ennis-Hill

Denise Lewis, Kelly Sotherton, Jessica Ennis-Hill, Katarina Johnson-Thompson – it is quite the line of succession. British sporting royalty one and all, following that quartet of heptathletes comes with a level of expectation unrivaled across the all-encompassing sphere of track and field. For Niamh Emerson, however – comparatively embryonic as an

“I’m very fit and I love racing”: Rosie Clarke on the steeplechase, challenging Kenya’s Commonwealth dominance and recovering from World Championship heartache

When the Commonwealth Games arrived in Glasgow four years ago, Rosie Clarke was, by her own admission, little more than a promising 1500m runner with a dream. She attended the competition as a spectator, her eyes fixated on Kate Avery – friend, former housemate and 10,000m athlete – who narrowly

“Once we’re out there, it’s every man for himself”: Nathan Fox on going up against his coach at the Commonwealth Games and the depth of British triple jumping

Six years ago, Nathan Fox perched on the edge of his bed in a Swedish hotel room, his eyes fixated on a television screen as Super Saturday unfolded. Greg Rutherford – a former training partner of Fox – stormed to a surprise gold medal on the night that illuminated the

“I was disgusted”: Jade Lally on 2012 Olympic rejection, the plight of British discus and fighting fit for the Commonwealth Games

For some athletes, the Commonwealth Games appear to represent little more than an opportunity to stretch one’s legs at the midway point between Olympic Games. For others, the world’s second largest multi-sport event is exactly that – a major meet from which to take home a major medal. Team England’s Jade

“I used to think it was a bit of a cop-out sport”: Gemma Bridge on her rapid race walking rise and balancing Commonwealth ambitions with a doctorate

Race walking is an interesting sport. Much-maligned and often cast aside as a pariah in amongst the hulking razzmatazz of track and field sport, the discipline was culled from the schedule altogether at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. An official reason for race walking’s absence from the Glaswegian streets was

“It just makes life so much easier”: Chris Adcock on playing doubles as husband and wife, funding cuts, a love of dogs and going for Commonwealth gold

Michael Jordan knew a fair bit about winning. And it was the great Chicago Bulls shooting guard who declared: “Talent wins games, but teamwork and intelligence win championships.” For Chris Adcock, these words could scarcely be more pertinent. Ranked seventh in world badminton, the 28-year-old heads to April’s Commonwealth Games as

“Because I loved boxing, people assumed that I wanted to be a boy”: Stacey Copeland on women’s boxing, perceptions of femininity and deciding against a nickname

Until 1997, women could not legally box in Great Britain. It would be another fifteen years before Nicola Adams and Katie Taylor would announce themselves to the world in London, as women’s boxing made its debut at the 2012 Olympics. Six years on, there are just three weight categories for women

“Success breeds popularity – people want a piece of it”: why women’s cricket continues its rapid rise

It was mid-afternoon on a muggy July Sunday when Anya Shrubsole put the finishing touches to the gold standard of World Cups. For one day shy of a month, English cricket put on a show like no other. It would be a spectacle with a fitting conclusion, with Shrubsole’s yorker

“I felt lost – I’d had this one goal to win the Olympics”: Adrian Moorhouse on swimming as escapism, Olympic gold and the mental strain on today’s athletes

“Yes, I won the Olympics but at some point, I couldn’t swim; like any other kid, I had to learn how,” Adrian Moorhouse reflects with a considered poignancy as we discuss the development of a champion athlete. It is a world that Moorhouse, a gold medallist in the 100m breaststroke at