‘I want to go a long way to changing lives’: Devon Petersen on national identity, being Africa’s only professional darts player and influencing a country’s future

The Fang dialect is spoken throughout Central Africa – it spans one million speakers spread across Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Congo and the minute islands of Sao Tome and Principe. Its part in the burgeoning growth of the Professional Darts Corporation (PDC) could scarcely register on even the most microscopic scale

A numbers game: Kirk Bevins on an obsession with numbers, life as a darts referee and conquering Countdown

To enter Apterous.org is to arrive in a different realm, a Narnia of the sharpest minds waiting beyond a digital wardrobe. On its homepage – for this is no mythical haven, but the home of a thriving online community – is a disclaimer. ‘Apterous is definitely not Countdown; it is not

“You have to play with the hand you’re dealt with”: Jamie Caven on defeating both logic and adversity

Much of the populist appeal of darts – first, in its takeover of terrestrial television screens in the 1970s and 1980s, and then in its unprecedented revival and growth under Barry Hearn’s chairmanship – has been aligned to the sport’s accessibility and its promotion of the ordinary accomplishing the extraordinary. As

“I love the game and I’m in love with the game”: Deta Hedman on rewriting history, darts’ gender pay gap, working nights and an elusive world title

Deta Hedman is a trailblazer. Quite simply, it is what she has always done. She laughs as she recounts the details of an extraordinary sporting career that has found space for itself in amongst a life packed full of challenges. “You could say that I’m a freak,” she says. To afford

“We just keep delivering a world class product”: PDC chief executive Matt Porter on growth, inclusion, Phil Taylor and Prince Harry

At the beginning of June, the sport of darts grew immeasurably. The rise in prize money at the PDC World Championship – now at £2.5 million – is, indeed, quantifiable. The sheer value, though, of the increase of participants – from 72 to 96 – is far more significant. It

Who are the tennis brothers?

It is a well trodden path, that of a sports star becoming a pundit. It is only natural for many retired athletes to want to continue and participate in their sport, and broadcasting is one way they can do this while earning. What the media looks for these days, though, is

Can Wimbledon do it better than the BBC?

Wimbledon take control of their own broadcasting for the first time in history. Sports Gazette reporter Emily Victoria spoke with Wimbledon's Head of Broadcasting, Paul Davies, to find out how this will impact fans watching at home, and if Wimbledon Broadcasting Services (WBS) can really live up to the BBC's

What I learned writing for the Sports Gazette

There is no better place to learn to be a sports journalist than the Sports Gazette. Or at least this is what I found out from my time as a Sports Journalism student writing regularly for the website. Not only did I become a better writer, but I also did a range