“There’s a reason why people who listen to cricket on the radio call it the soundtrack to their summer” — Adam Collins on purchasing broadcasting rights and the influence of new media

Sydney Cricket Ground. 1999. Over 40,000 Sydney-siders are cheering on Stuart MacGill as he takes seven wickets to seal another famous Ashes series victory for the Australians. Tens of thousands in the stadium are following every ball intently on their handheld radios. Fast forward two decades and one of those spectators,

Mike Brearley on the D’Oliveira affair, The 100, Joe Root and the future of Test Cricket

Mike Brearley is cricket's answer to Freud and Aristotle.  Part psychoanalyst, part philosopher, it was said of him by Australian opponent Rodney Hogg that 'he has a degree in people', and his leadership was so invaluable that he played 39 tests as a specialist batsman with an average of just 22.88. At the helm of England between 1977 and 1980 and